banner

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 
1. When should I be concerned about my child's communication development?
2. My two-year-old child appears delayed in speech-language development, but my pediatrician says he/she is probably just a late talker and will talk within the year. Should I do something now, or wait?
3. My child has a history of frequent ear infections. Could this affect his/her speech or language development?
4. What can I do at home to help my younger child's speech-language development?
5. How do I make an appointment for an evaluation?
6. Can my child start therapy immediately without doing an evaluation?
7. What happens during an Evaluation?
8. What happens in a therapy session?
9. How long is a therapy session?
10. Can I observe therapy sessions?
11. Do you offer home health services?
12. Do you offer home health services?
13. Do you offer co-treatments?
14. How do I cancel a session?
15 .Will my insurance cover the cost of therapy?
16 . How do I make payment?
17. Is the office closed on holidays?
18. What if I need to terminate therapy?
19. What are the charges?

20. What is ABA?
21. Why we do not offer ABA at this facility even though you are an Autism Center?
22. Does my child Speech, Occupational Therapy and ABA or other services?
23. What is the difference between the therapy services?
24. I know my child can receive Speech and Occupational Therapy services FTC, but where can I go to for ABA Services?

 

When should I be concerned about my child's development?
Back to Top

It is important to discuss any concerns you have with your pediatrician. You can find general information in the "red flags" and milestones sections of this website. If you wish to have your child evaluated to further investigate any concerns. Please contact our office at our Fredericksburg Center 540-446-2654 or Richmond Center 804-386-0485.


My two-year-old child appears delayed in speech-language development, but my pediatrician says he/she is probably just a late talker and will talk within the year. Should I do something now, or wait?

 

 



Back to Top

While it is true children show some variation in when they achieve early language milestones, it also is true that a skilled speech-language pathologist can usually identify children who are more at risk for persistent delays, or who are showing signs of more deviant speech language development (sometimes associated with other developmental disorders, such as autism). Thus, it is better to rule out a more serious problem at a young age.


My child has a history of frequent ear infections. Could this affect his/her speech or language development? 


Back to Top

Children with a medical history of chronic ear infections should have their hearing closely monitored. During episodes of ear infections, which involve fluid in the middle ear, the potential effect can be fluctuating hearing loss. If this is hearing loss is frequent and persistent, the child may not consistently pick up on speech sounds, therefore impacting their ability to correctly produce the missed sounds.





What can I do at home to help my younger child's speech-language development?


Back to Top

Generally speaking, understanding your child's current communication level (preverbal, single word communicator, phrase or sentence level communicator, etc.) is very important in terms of what to model at home. Try not to overuse questions to get your young child to talk, but rather model comments about events as they are unfolding. Try to avoid rapid and lengthy speaking turns, and encourage turn taking. Praise your child's efforts to communicate using all possible means: gestures, pointing, gaze, and verbal attempts. 
For more information visit www.asha.org


How do I make an appointment for an evaluation?
Back to Top

To make an appointment, please call the office at our Fredericksburg Center 540-446-2654 or Richmond Center 804-386-0485. You can also contact us through the contact page and someone will call you to set up an appointment that is convienent for you. You will be asked to provide information about your current concerns as well as insurance information (if applicable)..

Can my child start therapy immediately without doing an evaluation?
Back to Top

An assessment allows the speech-language pathologist to identify and describe your child’s strengths and weaknesses, compare him or her to other children of their age, and determine what would be the best approach to prepare the individualized treatment plan. However, if you have had a professional evaluation within the 3 months, please contact the office. At that time, we will determine whether additional testing is needed, and what course of treatment is recommended.

What happens during an Evaluation? 

Back to Top

Prior to all evaluations, parents complete the appropriate forms, which provide information regarding their current concerns, the child's medical, developmental, and educational history, as well as the review of our policies. This form can be found on the website under Forms, or will be given to you at the time of the appointment. We ask that everyone at least arrive 30 minutes prior to the evaluation to complete paperwork so that the entire time is spent with the clinician. If the child is receiving other services and/or school related services, please bring a copy of the reports and/or IEP (individual education plan).

During all evaluations, Your child's medical, developmental, and educational history is carefully reviewed. Parents are interviewed regarding their concerns and the child's history. This information helps the clinicians identify areas to evaluate more closely. A variety of methods, including formal and informal tests, observation, parent/caregiver interview, and play-based activities will be used to evaluate speech, language or occupational skills. Selection of testing methods is based on your child's individual needs.

Following all evaluations, Initial results of the evaluation and recommendations will be discussed with you. A written report detailing evaluation results and recommendations will be given to you or mailed to your home (if no services are deemed necessary) as well as faxed and/or mailed to your child's physician.

What happens in a therapy session?
Back to Top

Treatment plans and goals are implemented based upon your child's individual needs. This may include, but not limited to play based therapy, ABA, or the use of a multimodality approach to address the treatment goals and help your child meet the set  milestone goals.


How long is a therapy session?
Back to Top

We offer 30-minute therapy sessions for speech therapy sessions. Occupational therapy sessions are  50 minutes.  We respect your time as well as our own, and therefore, expect to start and end therapy at the designated scheduled times. The clinician will brief the parent and recommend homework if appropriate the last few minutes of the session..

Can I observe therapy sessions?
Back to Top

Most children perform best when working separately from parents. Parents will be invited to sit in for part or whole sessions only when appropriate. Please discuss any concerns that you have with your clinician. 

Do you offer home health services?
Back to Top

At this time, we only offer therapy services in the clinical setting, and do not offer home visits, or home health options

Do you offer co-treatments?
Back to Top

Yes, we do offer co-treatments for combined speech and occupational therapy sessions based on the child’s needs.

What are the charges?
Back to Top

Please call our office for the fee schedule.

How do I make payment?
Back to Top

Copays and/or due payments will be collected prior to the evaluation and/or therapy sessions.

We accept checks, cash, debit cards, as well as Visa, MasterCard and Discover. Outstanding balances can be paid online. please refer to the top of the Home Page.

Our billing specialists are also here to support our families, as well as create payment options in order to make therapy possible for all families.

What are the Attendance policies?

*CANCELLATIONS:
Cancellations must be made with 24 hours notice or a cancellation fee will be charged. We understand that due to illness or other unexpected events it may be necessary for you to occasionally cancel a therapy appointment. You can leave a message if you reach voicemail. We appreciate two weeks notice of vacation plans. Make up sessions are encouraged.

*NO SHOWS:
Two no call/no show appointments will result in discontinuation of services for your child, and they will be removed from the therapy schedule. PLEASE CALL if you cannot come to therapy.

*LATENESS:
Children arriving late for an appointment will be treated for the remainder of the scheduled treatment time. Insurance companies

*THERAPIST CANCELLATIONS:
Back to Top

We will notify you if a therapist as soon as possible if your appointment must be cancelled. If possible, we will schedule a make up session.

What if a session needs to be cancelled?
Back to Top

Please call our office if you need to cancel a session at our Fredericksburg Center 540-446-2654 or Richmond Center 804-386-0485. Cancellations must be made with 24 hours notice or a "cancellation fee" will be charged. We understand that due to illness or other unexpected events it may be necessary for you to occasionally cancel a therapy appointment. You can leave a message if you reach voicemail. We appreciate two weeks notice of vacation plans. Make up sessions are encouraged.


 

 



Is the office closed on holidays?
Back to Top

Below are the dates Fox Therapy Center, PLLC will be closed. There are no make up sessions for therapy sessions missed for holiday closures.

News Years Day
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Labor Day
Wed-Saturday the week of Thanksgiving
Christmas Eve
Christmas Day


**In cases of inclement weather please call the office or check our website**
PLEASE NOTE: Fox Therapy Center, PLLC reserves the right to change this schedule or close the office as needed with or without prior notification.

Will my insurance cover the cost of therapy?
Back to Top

Unfortunately, very few insurance companies reimburse parents for speech therapy to treat "developmental articulation disorders" or "developmental language disorders," limiting coverage to rehabilitative speech therapy (e.g. due to traumatic brain injury, surgery, or to treat congenitally related speech problems, such as cleft palate). Children with a diagnosis of autism are occasionally covered for limited services. All clients using insurance benefits are asked to contact their carrier directly regarding their benefits. It is the responsibility of the child’s parents to contact the insurance carrier and to understand their own benefits. Our billing specialist is happy to submit claims to insurance carriers for their review and determination of benefits. However, we are responsible for collecting your deductible amounts, co-payments, co-insurance payments or the cost of denied claims.

If you are planning to utilize your insurance benefits, we strongly recommend you contact your carrier and ask the following questions:

• Do I have speech therapy benefits available under my plan?
• Will an assessment be a covered benefit?
• What is included in my benefits for speech therapy?
• What is excluded from my benefits for speech therapy?
• Do I have developmental delay coverage for speech therapy?
• Do I have a limited number of visits per calendar year or per insurance benefit year?
• If I have a limited number of visits, are they combined with other therapies such as physical or occupational therapy?

What if I need to terminate therapy?
Back to Top

If you need to terminate therapy, for any reason, please give us two weeks notice so that we can wrap up therapy and complete final counseling with you. If your termination is due to financial concerns, please contact the Billing Center 540-479-1232 to set up payment options in order to continue the needed services.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact the General Manager at our Fredericksburg Center 540-446-2654 or Richmond Center  804-386-0485 by email: contact@foxtherapycenter.com

What is ABA?
Back to Top

ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) is the use of techniques designed to bring change in behavior. For children with Autism, ABA techniques help children build skills that address to change their behaviors in situations such as dinnertime and learning rote skills. ABA sessions most often occur in the home environment and typically occur for 20 hour per week. Data is collected on the various aspects of a client’s program. This is what guides their decision for introducing the next task to learn.

Why we do not offer ABA at this facility even though you are an Autism Center?
Back to Top

ABA can be an important part of a child with Autism’s therapy regimen; however, we go beyond ABA services by offering and targeting not just behavior, but also underlying components that influence and impact a child’s behavior. As stated in August 2015 by Dr. Melody Musgrove, Director of the office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), within the U.S. Department of Education, there are “concerns within the field” of special education. Specifically, OSEP received reports that treatments for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are overly focused on ABA therapy. She noted that “programs may be including applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapists exclusively without including, or considering input from, speech language pathologists and other professionals who provide different types of specific therapies that are appropriate for children with ASD.” We are seeing this same pattern in the outpatient private practice setting as well. Parents need to be aware that there are several services, including speech and occupational therapy, that are beneficial for their children with autism. ABA specialists are not qualified to provide speech, occupational, and other related services.

Does my child Speech, Occupational Therapy and ABA or other services?
Back to Top

It depends on the needs of the child. The earliest intervention possible is the important for any child with ASD. Most children with ASD need several services including speech, ABA, occupational therapy and more. Limiting your child to only one service may limit their overall growth potential.

What is the difference between the therapy services?
Back to Top

ABA therapists will typically set up a comprehensive curriculum based on the child’s performance and behavior, and then apply strategies to shape the child’s behavior for learning. ABA therapists come from the perspective of problem solving why a child does what they do, and helping them become more successful by engaging in more appropriate behaviors. However, if you are most concerned with your child improving their communication skills and overall speech and language development, SLP’s are the professionals best able to recommend particular communication aids and strategies for the child to obtain functional communication and speech and language growth.

Just like ABA, SLPs also take data and use certain ABA techniques to help the child with behavior and learning strategies; but they also go beyond those techniques to help them develop functional and social communication skills that can be generalized to more natural settings. In addition, SLPs design individual therapy that takes into account critical components of the developmental stage of speech and language development of the child, communication stages, memory, and understand how to modify the cognitive load for the child to be successful. Occupational therapy is also important for children with Autism.

Occupational therapists address the underlying sensory concerns that are not behavioral in nature. They assist children in gaining independence in their daily living skills (i.e. shoe tying, buttoning), as well as address the integration of reflexes, overall coordination as well as processing skills. The assist child with transitioning and how to self-regulate in order to be able to handle differing sensory environments.

Understanding each profession, and their overall scope of practice is essential to so make sure that the client and family are able to make the most informed decision regarding their child’s care, whether it is behavioral learning with ABA, or reaching speech, language and communication milestones with speech and language therapy, or working to improve sensory regulation and develop self care skills with occupational therapy.

I know my child can receive Speech and Occupational Therapy services FTC, but where can I go to for ABA Services?
Back to Top

There are several ABA providers in the area, and the list is growing! Please contact your pediatrician as well as your insurance company for a referral and to see if the service are covered.